Forza Horizon 4 Review

Category: Review 112

Forza Horizon 4 retains almost everything that made Forza Horizon 3 the best racer in its class and bakes it into a game that doesn’t ever want you to stop playing. The stunning visual quality and sound design, the massive array of automobiles, and the extensive and completely customisable career mode that have become hallmarks of the Horizon series are all here. What’s new is just how much more effectively Forza Horizon 4 encourages us to return thanks to its shifting seasons, regularly refreshed challenges, and steady stream of rewards.

Forza Horizon 4 upholds this tradition. Meaningful changes add interesting gameplay considerations and improve progression flow, on top of its already accommodating difficulty options, a smorgasbord of vehicles, and a beautiful open world overflowing with activities. With Horizon 4, Playground Games continues to excel at making the act of virtual driving exciting, approachable, and entertaining without sacrificing complexity.

Game Forza Horizon 4 Review 

But the biggest change to Horizon is the introduction of seasons. Horizon’s Britain cycles between summer, autumn, winter, and spring–and the weather in each season affects the world in tangible ways. These range from the obvious, like bodies of water freezing over, to the near-imperceptible, like the change in temperature affecting your tires. But seasons truly require you to adapt both your technique and your vehicle, and this variety produces a unique dynamic–the same dirt course you drive in summer will be boggy after an autumn rain, and asphalt roads will get slicker during the winter snow. In the first few hours of Horizon 4, the seasons will change after you’ve completed a number of activities, and this quick cycle reveals how necessary it is to consider and adjust your driving. But once you complete a whole cycle, the implementation of seasons changes: They’ll then be tied to an online server, synchronized for all players, and will rotate every seven days.

User said: “I can’t quite vouch for the more granular details of the environment that Playground Games nailed so well in Forza Horizon 3 because I don’t live in Britain, but overall Horizon 4’s Britain is just dazzling. It’s a place filled with quaint little towns, quiet farms, and snaking country roads lined with hedges and crumbling stone walls. Babbling brooks, dense forests, a wide beach, rocky mountaintops, castles, and other centuries-old structures are scattered all across the map. There also more life to it, with deer, rabbits, chickens, and some amazingly agile sheep in residence.”

Horizon 4 boasts 100 more vehicles over its predecessor, with a total of 450 in the base game. While Japanese car enthusiasts will definitely notice the absence of Mitsubishi and Toyota vehicles (no more Initial D Sprinter), Volkswagen has held over from Motorsport 7 (bringing classic Beetles, Kombis, and Golfs), as have a few new vehicles like racing trucks. Once again, Horizon features an array of tinkering options for enthusiasts, as well as auto-upgrade options and a number of accommodating driving assists for those who’d rather only think about accelerating and turning.

Regardless of how you drive, vehicles feel weighty, handle believably, and each one now has its own individual perk tree. Earning skill points while performing both reckless and prudent driving maneuvers will allow you to unlock nodes that add buffs to your skill point accumulation, or earn one-off rewards like wheelspins or influence (the game’s experience measure). It’s a great change from Horizons 3’s global skill tree, because it encourages you to stick with a vehicle, get to know it intimately, and have the advantage of a higher rate of reward. Skill points come readily if you’re driving at least somewhat competently, and you’re free to use points you earn on any vehicle, which makes swapping your go-to car less of a blow to your progression if you’ve already banked some extra points.

The Verdict 

I’ll always have a massive soft spot for the down under delights of Forza Horizon 3, but open-world racing has never looked as good as it does in Forza Horizon 4. It combines a beautiful world that’s really four hugely distinct maps in one with a constantly rewarding and self-renewing racing experience and I really can’t tear myself away from it. Playground Games hasn’t just upped the ante once again; it’s blown the bloody doors off.

Video Review Forza Horizon 4 :

>>> See more : Forza Horizon 4 Guide

User Rating :

– The Good:

+ Visually stunning open world overflowing with activities
+ Online functionality creates the impression of a dynamic world
+ Seasons create tangible changes which value your consideration
+ Meaningful improvements enhance accessibility and gameplay flow
+ Large range of difficulty modifiers creates a broadly welcoming experience
+ Big assortment of vehicles that continue to look and handle superbly

– The Bad:

Forzathon Live events are tedious

Rate this post

Related Articles